29 05, 2019

Improving Students’ Writing and Communication Skills

By | 2019-05-29T10:16:01+00:00 May 29th, 2019|Communication, higher education, writing|0 Comments

It is happening: the art of the written word is dying. With the growth of technology and the push to digitize everything, other skills have been pushed aside. Skills like writing have been deemed less valuable, even obsolete. The reality is, however, that writing skills are still incredibly necessary in today’s working world. This means writing and communication skills must be a cornerstone of college curriculum. Writing Skills in College Curriculum College is often viewed as preparation for the “real-world”, the workforce. So the atmosphere of the workforce tends to guide and shape the curriculum used in colleges. The current landscape has shifted to emphasize knowledge and understanding of technology. This may not seem like an opportunity for writing skills, but it actually creates a greater need for them. There is a high demand for writing skills in the workplace. Being able to effectively communicate allows for the free flowing of all other soft skills. From communication comes collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity. These skills are things that robots and other forms of technology [...]

23 05, 2018

Why Outsource Education Content Writing?

By | 2018-05-23T20:43:31+00:00 May 23rd, 2018|Course Writers, Curriculum Development, education, Educational Content, writing|0 Comments

The Worst Fake News Story in Education Ever: Those Who Can’t Do, Teach Any professional associated with education knows that teachers not only can do but must do much more than teach. Do some of these roles sound familiar? Conflict resolution specialist Data analyst Administrative professional Diplomat MC/Entertainer Communications manager And we haven’t even discussed content or curriculum development yet. In a 2014 study, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development found that teachers spend less than half of their time in school actually instructing students. Some of those non-teaching moments are unavoidable and necessary. But according to the same study, the second largest use of time by teachers is individual planning and preparation of lessons. What if we could reduce that time? What could teachers accomplish with those extra hours? Is it even possible to reduce prep time? It is--if educators take the leap and decide to outsource some content creation. We’re not talking about finding some faceless Internet vendor whose only experience with a classroom has been as a student. There are writers out [...]